Do Repositories Supported by Non-Profit Initiatives Represent the Future of Scientific Publishing?

Author:
Pablo Markin
Published Online: 2017-07-25
URL: http://openscience.com/do-repositories-supported-by-non-profit-initiatives-represent-the-future-of-scientific-publishing/


[T]he number of publications published in the pre-print format has been growing exponentially in recent years, as scientific disciplines, such as biology, and their subfields are increasingly recognizing the necessity of OA for furthering the sharing of recent research results, while minimizing the time gap between empirical research and manuscript availability. Thus, in 2017 the monthly number of pre-prints has reached over 1,400 articles from as little as between 400 and 200 in 2014. This pre-print growth has been fueled by the relaxation of peer review procedures, similar to arXiv. In fact, a parallel initiative in biology is dubbed bioRxiv that not only replicates arXiv’s approach to OA, but also has attracted extensive institutional backing in the form of both preprint publication pledges and financial support from non-profit organizations, such as the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

Though pre-print repositories’ review practices diverse from the strict peer review standards of scientific journals, their rapid and decentralized nature may be well fitting the pace of development in established and emergent research fields that are likely to benefit from OA to their findings.

By Pablo Markin


The original  blog article and additional resources can be found at OpenScience blog.

The Growing Prevalence of Open Access and Open Source Initiatives in Economics

Author:
Pablo Markin
Published Online: 2017-04-30

In recent years, a growing number of universities support open access textbook initiatives aimed at lowering the education costs of social sciences students, such as in the field of economics. Thus, the OpenStax initiative of Rice University has supported the development of open access textbooks for both the Introduction into Economics courses and for more focused Principles of Macro-Economics and Micro-Economics courses. These courses are available both in web-based versions and as PDF-files. In addition to these materials, instructors can access course materials that can be used for graded quizzes and final exams. The macro- and micro-economics text books exist in editions that are oriented at both college-level students and high school students taking advanced-placement courses.

By Pablo Markin


The original  blog article and additional resources can be found at OpenScience blog.